It’s hard to believe that Carl passed away eight years ago from carcinoid (neuroendocrine) cancer in 2011. He was only 64 years old.

As a young man, Carl loved watching his brother, Richard (a successful painter), create an image out of paper and pencil - “it was like magic watching the art come to life”. He, however, didn’t start seriously drawing/painting himself until his mid-30’s. From that point on, his study of art was confined to weekends and evenings until he was finally able to follow his dream of painting full-time in 2001.

After an awful bike accident in 2006 while training to ride a leg of the Giro D’Italia, it was found that besides the broken bones he endured, he also had carcinoid/neuroendocrine tumors on his liver and would have to start immediate treatment. He lived only 4 1/2 years after that diagnosis but somehow managed to produce his best work.

It seems only yesterday that he was packing up his gear to paint the New England landscape with his dear friend/mentor, Bill Ternes. At night, he didn’t read for fun - he “studied” one of the masters in his extensive art library. Then each day before he left to paint, he would say, “I’m going to paint a “Sargent … Cassatt… Merritt Chase today”. He would return home later in the day, place a painting on the living room mantel and show me what he had accomplished!

Before art became his main focus, his drive to become a successful businessman and provide for his family was all encompassing. I often teased that I married a German IBM businessman and halfway through our marriage he became a passionate Italian artist. Many of you knew him as both — his range of talent and skill was extraordinary!

He rose quickly to a managerial level in the health care industry and was CEO of a medical start up company by the time he was 37. Later he joined Heidrick and Struggles in Boston, a global executive search firm and became a partner and managing director. Simultaneously, he was still driven to explore his artistic side. When I met him, he played piano beautifully, cooked like a French chef and loved languages — which began by learning Japanese for intelligence work in the Navy. As the years passed, he studied violin, became fluent in Italian, conversant in French and German. He also explored woodworking, built stone walls, skied, rode his bike, etc. If there was anything new to explore or learn, he was up for the challenge — definitely a Renaissance man.

By his 40’s, art became his all encompassing passion. He took art classes and workshops with master painters in Boston, and eventually began to find his own style. He felt most at home painting in Italy and we took trips to Rome, Tuscany and northern Italy. By his late 50’s he was in The Wally Findlay Gallery in NYC, J. Todd Gallery in Wellesley, and The Christina Gallery on the Vineyard.

In 2009, we took our last trip to Italy with his sister, Marguerite, who was also fighting cancer, and her husband, Mike. Both Carl and Marg were in remission during this trip and he created some of his most beautiful paintings. After coming home, their illnesses returned and both he and Marg passed away a year later.

Our family’s greatest hope is that Carl’s work will find its way into the hands of the people who knew and loved him and others who are perhaps seeing his work for the first time. We intend to donate a portion of all proceeds to the Neuroendocrine Tumor Research Foundation in hopes that the research they are doing will lead to earlier detection and enable others to survive this horrible disease.

Carl led a full and dynamic life and we were all blessed to have shared that time with him. He inspired many to follow their passion — even under difficult circumstances. Thank you for your support and love over the last years.

Nancy Schaad

Reflections

watching art come to life . . .

Nancy's Reflections- on a Life with Carl

8/14/2019

 

It’s hard to believe that Carl passed away eight years ago from carcinoid (neuroendocrine) cancer in 2011. He was only 64 years old.

As a young man, Carl loved watching his brother, Richard (a successful painter), create an image out of paper and pencil - “it was like magic watching the art come to life”. He, however, didn’t start seriously drawing/painting himself until his mid-30’s. From that point on, his study of art was confined to weekends and evenings until he was finally able to follow his dream of painting full-time in 2001.

After an awful bike accident in 2006 while training to ride a leg of the Giro D’Italia, it was found that besides the broken bones he endured, he also had carcinoid/neuroendocrine tumors on his liver and would have to start immediate treatment. He lived only 4 1/2 years after that diagnosis but somehow managed to produce his best work.

It seems only yesterday that he was packing up his gear to paint the New England landscape with his dear friend/mentor, Bill Ternes. At night, he didn’t read for fun - he “studied” one of the masters in his extensive art library. Then each day before he left to paint, he would say, “I’m going to paint a “Sargent … Cassatt… Merritt Chase today”. He would return home later in the day, place a painting on the living room mantel and show me what he had accomplished!

Before art became his main focus, his drive to become a successful businessman and provide for his family was all encompassing. I often teased that I married a German IBM businessman and halfway through our marriage he became a passionate Italian artist. Many of you knew him as both — his range of talent and skill was extraordinary!

He rose quickly to a managerial level in the health care industry and was CEO of a medical start up company by the time he was 37. Later he joined Heidrick and Struggles in Boston, a global executive search firm and became a partner and managing director. Simultaneously, he was still driven to explore his artistic side. When I met him, he played piano beautifully, cooked like a French chef and loved languages — which began by learning Japanese for intelligence work in the Navy. As the years passed, he studied violin, became fluent in Italian, conversant in French and German. He also explored woodworking, built stone walls, skied, rode his bike, etc. If there was anything new to explore or learn, he was up for the challenge — definitely a Renaissance man.

By his 40’s, art became his all encompassing passion. He took art classes and workshops with master painters in Boston, and eventually began to find his own style. He felt most at home painting in Italy and we took trips to Rome, Tuscany and northern Italy. By his late 50’s he was in The Wally Findlay Gallery in NYC, J. Todd Gallery in Wellesley, and The Christina Gallery on the Vineyard.

In 2009, we took our last trip to Italy with his sister, Marguerite, who was also fighting cancer, and her husband, Mike. Both Carl and Marg were in remission during this trip and he created some of his most beautiful paintings. After coming home, their illnesses returned and both he and Marg passed away a year later.

Our family’s greatest hope is that Carl’s work will find its way into the hands of the people who knew and loved him and others who are perhaps seeing his work for the first time. We intend to donate a portion of all proceeds to the Neuroendocrine Tumor Research Foundation in hopes that the research they are doing will lead to earlier detection and enable others to survive this horrible disease.

Carl led a full and dynamic life and we were all blessed to have shared that time with him. He inspired many to follow their passion — even under difficult circumstances. Thank you for your support and love over the last years.

Nancy Schaad